Tips On Using Anti Anxiety Drugs To Stop Your Cat From Spraying

If you have multiple cats, there is a chance that you have encountered one or several spraying incidents. If your cats are new, then this is excusable because they still lack training but if your cats have been with you forever and have only started spraying habits now, they may be suffering from anxiety and stress. Yes, cats do experience anxiety and this can be caused by several factors: prolonged separation, feline threats (outsider cats), or mating responses. Fortunately, it is now a clinically approved method to use anti anxiety drugs to stop your cats’ spraying habits. Here are some tips on using cat marking anti anxiety drugs:1. Identify which of your cats is doing the spraying.Although it is more convenient to administer anti anxiety drugs to all of your cats in one go, this can be detrimental to the health of the cats that are perfectly alright. Anti anxiety drugs correct chemical imbalances so if they are administered to cats that don’t experience imbalance, they might cause problems. Stake out the area that smells of cat urine or where the spraying usually occurs for several days and observe your cats to identify which one does it.2. Narrow down possibilities.Once you have identified which cat it is, do not take it to the vet for a does of anti anxiety drug just yet. Set some time to rule out other possible causes of behavior other than anxiety. Is your cat neutered? Cats that are not neutered often exhibit aggressive territorial behaviors like cat-marking. Is your cat’s litter box clean? Cats are clean creatures by nature and would be most reluctant to use a litter box that is dirty. If your cat is neutered and its litter box is clean, then anti anxiety drugs might be the answer.3. Collect information prior to a veterinary visit.Administering anti anxiety drugs is not enough to ensure that your cat will quit the spraying habit. You need to put a stop to the cause of the anxiety. To do this, you need to spend time identifying possible causes to discuss with your cat’s vet. Take note of the time or event when the spraying usually occurs. Does it happen when you are not in the house? Or, did your cat started spraying when that big dog moved next door? Information like these can help your vet determine the right cat marking anti anxiety drugs for your cat. Keep in mind to follow the vet’s prescriptions for anti anxiety drugs faithfully to help your cat overcome anxiety and stop the spraying habit. Anti anxiety drugs work and function well only if they are used following the right dosage and period intake.